Upcoming 2021 Courses

Now Enrolling for Fall 2021

ENGFLM 0400/ FMST 0120 Introduction to Film (multiple instructors and multiple days)

This is a basic course on the visual arts that offers the student abroad introduction to the medium of film. As part of this overview, the class will consider such issues as: the process of contemporary film production and distribution; the nature of basic film forms; selected approaches to film criticism; comparisons between film and the other media. It counts for the FMS Major or Minor as a Category II course.
 
This course counts for DSAS The Arts General Ed. Requirement, SCI Polymathic Contexts: Humanistic GE. Req., and Russian & East European Studies.

ENGFLM 0401/ FMST 0130  Introduction to Visual Culture

T 6-9:50, 244B CL

This course develops skills to interpret visual culture in contemporary life. Using a wide variety of media, including film, television, advertisements, fashion magazines, museum exhibits, comic books, painting, graffiti, video games, the web, and photography, the course focuses on understanding how conceptions of visuality, gender, race, and politics shape definitions of high and low culture as well as questions of knowledge and being. This is a Critical Studies course and counts for Category II towards the Film and Media Studies major and minor. This course counts for the Digital Media Certificate and the Television/Broadcast Arts Certificate.
 
This course counts for DSAS The Arts General Ed. Requirement, SCI Polymathic Contexts: Humanistic GE. Req., and Global Studies.

ENGFLM 0530/ FMST 0150  Film Analysis with Dr Alison Patterson

W 6-9:50, 232 CL + Recitation on Friday

This course introduces students to the art of the cinema, and to the techniques for its formal and iconographic analysis.  It examines the nature of shot composition and visual framing, the use of color, the role of lighting as a pictorial element, the potentials of camera movement, the modes of editing and the nature of image/sound montage.  It also introduces students to dominant cinema forms--narrative, experimental, documentary, etc.--And connects the cinema to visual arts (like painting and sculpture). This course is a required course for the FMS major and minor.
 
This course counts for DSAS The Arts General Ed. Requirement and SCI Polymathic Contexts: Humanistic GE. Req.

ENGFLM 0540/ FMST 0170 World Film History with Dr Neepa Majumdar

W 1-4:50, 221 CL

This course both introduces students to techniques of film analysis and acquaints them with major works and movements in international cinema.  The course pays particular attention to the evolution of film narrative and visual style through landmarks in film development--European avant-garde films,  British documentary, Italian neo-realism, etc.  This is a Critical Studies course and is a required course for the Film and Media Studies major and minor.
 
This course counts for DSAS The Arts General Ed. Requirement, DSAS Historical Analysis General Ed. Requirement, SCI Polymathic Contexts: Humanistic GE. Req., SCI Polymathic Contexts: Soc/Behav. GE. Req., European and Eurasian Studies, Global Studies, West European Studies.

ENGFLM 0712/ENGLIT 0712 Critical Making

Wednesdays, 6-8:30, 249 CL

Critical making is about engaging and creatively remaking the world around us. Why do we, as a culture, make things? What are the narratives and politics that inform our making? What social relationships are embodied in object relationships? How might an engagement with material culture change the way we relate to others, or to ourselves? Conversely, how might engaging narratives of making change the ways we think about making things? In this course we will examine the history and stories of the “maker movement” that is in the process of rapidly changing the place of making in our culture. We'll consider both utopian and dystopian forms of making. We'll visit various maker spaces on and off campus and learn from their tools and environments. If you have any experience making things—from CAD to traditional crafts to coding to textiles to electronics—you will be able to put it to use in this class! You will learn some basic making tools along the way (scanning, basic 3D modeling, and 3D printing) and have access to many more tools if you wish to use them, so while many skills and experiences are applicable to this class, none are required. Final projects are maker projects, which can be accomplished individually or in groups. Students from all departments, backgrounds and experience levels are welcome. This course is crosslisted between ENGLIT, ENGFLM, and ENGCMP, with only five seats in each section, so if one section is full, enroll in another.
 
Current open sections are ENGFLM 0712 and ENGLIT 0712.
 

ENGFLM 1290 - 1000 American Film History 1: From the Silents to Sound

Instructor: Ali Patterson, PhD
Web based
 
American Film History 1 explores the development of American film from 1895 to 1939. Though the course will emphasize the evo-lution of American film style and genre, attention will also be paid to the history of the American film industry, and the relationship between Hollywood cinema and the broader cultural context of American society.
 
A web-based, asynchronous course, American Film History 1 provides opportunities for Critical Making (story boards, short films, and video essays) and the use of digital archives to advance course goals and produce new knowledge and artefacts about the topic. Texts include Miriam Hansen’s Babel and Babylon, Jacqueline Najuma Stewart’s Migrating to the Movies: Cinema and Black Urban Modernity and projects will include brief video essays and annotations and desktop documentaries though no production or software experience is expected or required.
 
This is a Critical Studies course and counts for Category I towards the Film and Media Studies major and minor.
 

ENGFLM 1400/ FMST 1532 Superheroes on Film and TV with Dr Mark Best

Th 6-9:50, 249 CL

This course explores a wide range of issues relevant to the superhero genre in popular media, including: the origins of the genre; various cultural critics' responses to it; the intersections between superhero narratives, audiences, and the cultural and historical contexts that produce them; and the ever-changing form and structure of the genre itself. This is a Critical Studies course and counts for Category II towards the Film and Media Studies major and minor.

ENGFLM 1470/FMST 1350 Film Directors: Tod Browning & James Whale

Instructor: Mark Lynn Anderson
Thursdays 1:00 p.m. to 4:50 p.m.
244B Cathedral of Learning
 
Renowned as two of the most important pioneering directors of the horror genre, the films of Browning and Whale span four decades of studio-era productions in genres as diverse as the crime film, the musical, the war picture, comedy, and melodrama. Both filmmakers worked at Universal and both were concerned with the fate of social outcasts and misfits. This course considers how their astonishing careers and cinematic artistry remain deeply relevant today with respect to disability, racial justice, queer identities, and the legacies of colonization.
 
This is a Critical Studies course and counts for Category I towards the Film and Media Studies major and minor.
 
 

ENGFLM 1485/ FMST 1410 Film and Politics

M 6-9:50, 244B CL

This course examines film production, economics and forms of representation as reflections of political attitudes.  We will study a variety of narrative and non-fiction films which reveal differing political points of view, ranging from those that legitimize the dominant culture to those which criticize, if not challenge, dominant attitudes.  This is a Critical Studies course and counts for Category II towards the Film and Media Studies major and minor. This is a “W” course. This course counts for the CGS Digital Media certificate.
 
This course counts for DSAS The Arts General Ed. Requirement, Writing Intensive Course (WRIT), SCI Polymathic Contexts: Humanistic GE. Req., European and Eurasian Studies, Global Studies, Transatlantic Studies, and West European Studies.

ENGFLM 1695/ FMST 1525 Horror Film with Dr Adam Lowenstein

T 1-4:50, 244B CL

This course will investigate the key films and critical discussions surrounding the horror genre from its silent film beginnings to the present. We will use horror as a lens to ask wide-ranging questions about spectatorship, theory, history, aesthetics, and politics that have shaped and continue to transform film and media studies.  This course examines horror subgenres, the ways that producers and directors have developed the genre, and the ways horror film exploits social attitudes and values to generate audience involvement. This is a Critical Studies course and counts for Category II towards the Film and Media Studies major and minor.

ENGFLM 1703 Gender and Film

Th 9-12:50, 407 CL

This course examines and questions aspects of gender and sexuality in international cinema. While the course considers the intersectional realities affecting masculinity and femininity on-screen, it will also consider who is behind the camera and ideas of "authentic" representation. Attention will also be paid to the social and historical context in which these films were made, in an attempt to understand the relationship between art and ideology. This is a Critical Studies course and counts for Category II towards the Film and Media Studies major and minor.
 
This course counts for DSAS Diversity General Ed. Requirement, Writing Intensive Course (WRIT), Gender, Sexuality & Women's St, and SCI Diversity General Ed. Requirements.

ENGFLM 1920/ FMST 1699 Advanced Seminar in Film Studies with Dr Neepa Majumdar

This course is designed for Film and Media Studies majors and can be taken only when all other major requirements are satisfied.  It will focus on issues of film history (either as an historical survey or through an examination of particular themes and/or problems that have arisen in the critical literature).  The class will be organized as a seminar, and will involve considerable writing and/or class presentation on the part of students.  This Category II course is a required capstone in the Critical Studies track of the Film and Media Studies major. This is a W course.

FMST 0320 Russian Film: Eisenstein and Company

T 6-9:50, 444 CL

The course presents the history of Russian and Soviet films, filmmaking, and the film industry from the coronation of Tsar Nicholas II to the death of Stalin. This Category 1 course is a W course in the Film and Media Studies major.
 
This course counts for DSAS The Arts General Ed. Requirement, DSAS Geographic Region General Ed.,
Writing Intensive Course (WRIT), SCI Polymathic Contexts: Global&Cross Cul GE. Req., SCI Polymathic Contexts: Humanistic GE. Req.

FMST 0800 Filmmaking 1: Fundamentals

(multiple instructors and multiple days)
 
Filmmaking is a creative process that combines art, science, craft, and collaboration. This course is a hands-on introduction to the process, starting with the building blocks of motion pictures: light and cameras, composition, editing, and visual storytelling. You will complete two short videos over the course of the semester, shooting video with DSLR cameras and editing using Adobe Premiere Pro. In-class exercises will provide a deeper understanding of making moving images.

FMST 0826 Postproduction with John Cantine

W 6 – 9pm, G26 CL
 
In this course, students will explore the possibilities of digital editing through the software of Adobe’s Creative Cloud suite, concentrating on Premiere while incorporating AfterEffects, Audition, and Media Encoder using Dynamic Link. Students will review basic editing theory and discuss more advanced concepts relating to continuity editing and various approaches to discontinuity. Students will edit a short continuity scene using footage shot in class or provided by the instructor, and a short profile piece based on subject interviews. Each student will also present an in-depth analysis of the editing in a feature film, series episode, or other motion picture. No filmmaking experience is necessary. This is a Production course and counts as a Technical Elective in the Film and Media Production Track and for Category III towards the Film and Media Studies major and minor.

FMST 0845 Filmmaking 2: Sight and Sound

(multiple instructors and multiple days)
 
In this hands-on course, you will continue to acquire the skills required to design, shoot and edit HD video. Demonstrations and in-class exercises introduce more professional camera operation, lighting, sound, special effects, and editing workflows. You will apply this new knowledge and facility to several out-of-class assignments of increasing sophistication over the course of the semester.

FMST 0855 Topics in Production: Bias in Everyday Life at Pitt

W 6 – 9pm, 407 CL
 
Topics in Production: Bias in Everyday Life at Pitt is a course designed to bring to fruition a series of narrative and documentary film vignettes developed by film students in Spring 2021 for the Year of Engagements. You will produce, shoot, edit and distribute these films on the topic of microaggressions experienced by members of the Pitt community. Depending on whether you are on a narrative or documentary project, expect to work with actors or conduct interviews, and crew on classmates' projects. You will also be heavily involved in feedback and critique in class. By the end of the term, you will have a short film to add to your portfolio.

FMST 1855 Directing Motion Pictures

Th 6 – 9pm, 407 CL
 
This course addresses some of the basic problems of designing and directing scenes for motion pictures.  Some of the problems discussed are the relationship of film to reality, the meaning of cinematic techniques, continuity, shot selection, cut selection and visualization techniques. The format is a combination of lecture, screening and interactive group exercises.  Extensive outside work is necessary.

FMST 1880 Digital Cinematography with Frank Caloiero

Tu 6 – 9pm, 407 CL
 
This course will cover advanced video technology and professional techniques of videography. Emphasis will be placed on high image quality and meeting broadcast specifications for video and audio. Professional-quality video cameras will be covered extensively.

FMST 1885 Broadcasting

(multiple instructors and multiple days)

Broadcasting introduces students to television production through academic and hands-on experience, utilizing the University of Pittsburgh's new state-of-the-art television studios and equipment. In addition to students learning how to produce a live broadcast event for collegiate teams and a news broadcast, guest lecturers will talk about the industrial realities of the profession. Students will understand how to format and make a show rundown, apply graphics, utilize replay, work a television camera, comprehend audio application and mixing, produce and direct live events and news broadcast, as well as gain experience in front of the camera as news anchors, reporters and on-air talent for live events.

FMST 1886 Broadcasting 2

Tu 9am – 12pm, 116 Victoria Bldg
 
The unique and dynamic Broadcasting 2 course will utilize every aspect of the state-of-the-art Pitt Studios, offering students a challenging and stimulating curriculum. Students will produce a Live Event Show Open (incorporating all pre-production elements), a Newscast, and a Podcast, incorporating video and animation marketing support. Students' projects will be crewed by classmates.

FMST 1893 Human Interest Stories for Broadcast with Kevin Smith

MoWe 11am – 12:50pm 407 CL
 
Human Interest Stories for Broadcast will teach students how to present and tell a compelling story about a person, place, or thing in the confines of television broadcast, streaming, or social media platform. Writing techniques for television, research techniques, interview techniques, adding graphics, mixing sound and music, video, tracking and voice-over will be required for the feature packages ranging from :45 seconds in length to 3:00 minutes in length. This is a Category III class that combines critical and production elements. This course counts for the Film and Media Studies major and minor.

FMST 1921 Filmmaking 4: Capstone with John Cantine

Th 6 – 9pm 444 CL
 
This is a capstone course in motion picture production. Each student will have the option to create an individual project of their choice, which can be any genre of narrative, documentary, or experimental. Students who choose to work on their own personal project should be prepared to pitch the project to the class and the instructor during the first class session. Through script workshops, preproduction reviews, and critique of rough cuts, the instructor will mentor you through the filmmaking process. Depending on class size, students may have the option to instead work together on a collaborative project, with different students filling the roles of producer, writer, director, and editor, and taking on multiple roles in the production crew. This course is a requirement for Film and Media Studies students taking the Production Track.

FMST 1740 Making the Documentary with Professor Carl Kurlander

T 1-4, 203 DL

Building on previous courses documenting the development of the Salk polio vaccine, transplant pioneer Dr. Thomas Starzl, and George Romero, this course will use materials related to the newly acquired August Wilson archives to make a researched-based student documentary exploring the life and work of August Wilson, focusing on his formative years in Pittsburgh and the work inspired by this city.  Students will be actively involved in researching the history of Pittsburgh as described in Wilson's plays, delving into the social and cultural forces which informed the playwright's work, and filming interviews with those who knew Wilson and scholars who have studied his work.  Under the guidance of professional mentors, students will make a documentary about August Wilson and the past and present of the African American experience in Pittsburgh.  The resulting product will become part of the university archives. No filmmaking experience is necessary and this course is open to all majors. This is a Production course and counts for Category III towards the Film and Media Studies major and minor.
 
This course counts for DSAS Creative Work General Ed. Requirement, SCI Polymathic Contexts: Humanistic GE. Req.
 

FR 0280 History of French Cinema

W 6-8:30, 358 CL

This course will introduce students to the history of cinema in France from the beginnings of cinema to the present day. We will examine films from all periods and consider a diversity of forms and genres, including mainstream narrative films, art films, avant-garde experiments, blockbusters, and documentaries. No previous course experience with cinema is presumed as we will learn the basics of how to watch, discuss, and write about films and the film industry. The course will be taught in English; readings will be available in English; and all films with have English subtitles.  This is a Critical Studies course and counts for Category I towards the Film and Media Studies major and minor.
 
This course counts for DSAS The Arts General Ed. Requirement, DSAS Geographic Region General Ed.,
SCI Polymathic Contexts: Global&Cross Cul GE. Req., SCI Polymathic Contexts: Humanistic GE. Req.

ITAL 0085 Italian Cinema Icons with Dr Alberto Iozzia

M 6-8:30 204 Frick

Rotting zombies, evil witches, and merciless cowboys meet superstar directors, iconic actors, and award-winning composers in ITAL0085: Italian Cinema Icons. This course moves through the genres of Italian cinema and focuses on the most influential artists and on the most representative films. We are going to go from the war film masterpieces of the 1940s to the gory exploitation horror of the 1970s, from Sergio Leone's re-invention of western films to Mario Bava's rip-off of The Exorcist: this class really has something for everyone. So come enjoy what you love already and discover what you are going to love next. No previous course experience with cinema is presumed. The course will be taught in English; readings will be available in English; all films will have English subtitles.
 
This Category 1 course is an elective in the FMS major and minor.
 

JPNSE 1085/ CHIN 1085 Introduction to East Asian Cinema with Dr Charles Exley

W 1-4:50, 106 DL

This course investigates the ways in which film addresses and treats the major socio-cultural issues in modern society through a critical study of the works of Chinese and Japanese master filmmakers. The course focuses on changes in marriage and family patterns, women's roles and the plight of youth.

This Category 1 course is an elective in the FMS major.

This course counts for DSAS The Arts General Ed. Requirement, DSAS Cross-Cult. Awareness General Ed. Requirement, DSAS Geographic Region General Ed. Requirement, SCI Polymathic Contexts:

Global&Cross Cul GE. Req., SCI Polymathic Contexts: Humanistic GE. Req.

Now Enrolling for Summer 2021

ENGFLM 0355 Visual Literacy with Dr Alison Patterson 

Summer 12 week 
 
This is a dedicated asynchronous online course. Visual literacy is an emerging area of study which deals with the growing importance of visual culture in our contemporary world and how we interpret what is seen.  This course will emphasize the process of critically viewing specific media artifacts and provide tools to students that will allow them to comprehend and evaluate information presented by a variety of forms of visual media, including television, video, film, photography, and the internet. This is a Critical Studies course and counts for Category II towards the Film and Media Studies major and minor.It counts for DNID.  
 
This course counts for DSAS The Arts General Ed. Requirement, DSAS Creative Work General Ed. Requirement,
and SCI Polymathic Contexts: Humanistic GE. Req. 

 

ENGFLM 0400/ FMST 0120 Introduction to Film with Eve Barden 

T/TH  6-9:50 PM, WEB, 6WK1 

This is a basic course on the visual arts that offers the student abroad introduction to the medium of film. As part of this overview, the class will consider such issues as: the process of contemporary film production and distribution; the nature of basic film forms; selected approaches to film criticism; comparisons between film and the other media.It counts for the FMS Major or Minor as a Category II course. 
 
This course counts for DSAS The Arts General Ed. Requirement, SCI Polymathic Contexts: Humanistic GE. Req., and Russian & East European Studies. 

 

ENGFLM 0530/ FMST 0150  Film Analysis with Geneveive Newman 

MW 12-3:50 PM, WEB, 6WK2 
 
This course introduces students to the art of the cinema, and to the techniques for its formal and iconographic analysis.  It examines the nature of shot composition and visual framing, the use of color, the role of lighting as a pictorial element, the potentials of camera movement, the modes of editing and the nature of image/sound montage.  It also introduces students to dominant cinema forms--narrative, experimental, documentary, etc.--And connects the cinema to visual arts (like painting and sculpture).This course is a required course for the FMS major and minor. 
 
This course counts for DSAS The Arts General Ed. Requirementand SCI Polymathic Contexts: Humanistic GE. Req. 
 

 

ENGFLM 0532/ FMST 0500 Introduction to Film Genres with Adam Hebert 

MW 6-9:50, WEB, 6WK2 
 
This course surveys major film genres, which may include Westerns, musicals, horror, film noir, screwball comedy, etc. We will trace the history of film genres from the studio era to the present, including European transformations. The course seeks to relate film genres to the culture that created them. This is a Critical Studies course and counts for Category II towards the Film and Media Studies major and minor. 
 
This course counts for a W course. 

 

ENGFLM 0540/ FMST 0170 World Film History with Nikhil Titus 

MW 12-3:50 PM, WEB, 6WK1 
 
This course both introduces students to techniques of film analysis and acquaints them with major works and movements in international cinema.  The course pays particular attention to the evolution of film narrative and visual style through landmarks in film development--European avant-garde films,  British documentary, Italian neo-realism, etc.  This is a Critical Studies course and is a required course for the Film and Media Studies major and minor. 
 
This course counts for DSAS The Arts General Ed. Requirement, DSAS Historical Analysis General Ed. Requirement, SCI Polymathic Contexts: Humanistic GE. Req., SCI Polymathic Contexts: Soc/Behav. GE. Req. European and Eurasian Studies, Global Studies, West European Studies. 
 
 

ENGFLM 1390/ FMST 1275 Contemporary Film with Jordan Parrish 

TTH 12-3:50, WEB, 6WK1 
 
Surveys international film from 1970 to the present and the major film movements of the period.  It also demonstrates the stylistic and cultural interrelationships between the international film schools. This is a Critical Studies course and counts for Category I towards the Film and Media Studies major and minor. 
 
This course counts for DSAS The Arts General Ed. Requirement, Writing Intensive Course (WRIT), SCI Polymathic Contexts: Humanistic GE. Req., European and Eurasian Studies, Global Studies, Transatlantic Studies, and West European Studies.